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The motorcycling industry in Nepal can be split into three general segments. The first segment is the commuter segment. Made for the people who need a workhorse of a motorcycle to get stuff done, they are built to get you from one place to another efficiently. It isn’t going to get you anywhere fast, but you’ll get amazing mileage and the running costs are pretty cheap. Think Platinas, Shines, Hayates, and Splendors.

 

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Then there is the 200-300cc segment that dips a toe into performance motorcycling territory. Serving the commuting purpose while remaining a motorcycle that is fun to ride is a tricky business, but that is what most of these motorcycles set out to do. Although still a far cry from actual high-performance motorcycles, this segment keeps the dream alive for motorcycle enthusiasts. The third category includes the ones on the posters we stuck in our bedroom walls and grew up dreaming about one day owning. We’re talking about the Hayabusas and Fireblade here. It will cost you an arm and a leg to purchase and pay for the running costs, but it will all be worth it.

 

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While owning your dream bike is the ultimate goal, it might not happen overnight. So, to keep the dream alive, the majority of us dreamers find the sweet spot in the 250cc space. Motorcycles in this segment are up to the task of undertaking the role of a commuter which can get you around and you can also do a bit of into touring and fast riding whenever you get the chance. In this review of the Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF, we see if it can help us find the riding sweet spot.

 

IN TERMS OF LOOKS,

 

the Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF hits the nail on the head, especially the Moto GP Edition that dawns the stunning and iconic blue and yellow colors. More often than not, people purchasing a motorcycle from this segment are looking for that “big bike” feel. And, with the Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF, you get exactly that with their all-new design language.

 

 

Overall, it is handsomely built and well proportioned. The sharply designed LED headlight seamlessly merges into the wind visor, which is a little too small to fit the function and is one of the few gripes that we have with the motorcycle. The fairings and tanks are well sculpted and emphasize the fresh new appeal of the Gixxer SF 250. And to keep things sporty, you get the clip-on bars and beefy tires- a 150 mm tire at the rear, and a 110 mm tire on the front wheel.

 

 

Around back, the tail section is sleekly designed with a newly designed LED tail light. The double-barrel exhaust is also newly designed, but the shiny, squarish styling does seem a little out of place when you look at the overall appearance. The LCD instrument panel gets a premium dark blue backlit finish and reads the current speed you are on, rev counter, gear position indicator, and clock. Additional information includes dual trip meters and tell-tale lights. All in all, the Gixxer 250 SF succeeds in becoming a good looking motorcycle.

 

AND IT CONTINUES TO IMPRESS ONCE YOU’RE ON THE ROAD TOO.

 

The all-new 249cc single-cylinder, four-valve, the oil-cooled engine churns out 26bhp of maximum power at 9,000 rpm and 22.6 Nm of peak torque at 7,500 rpm. And with the new Gixxer 250 SF, all those numbers are smoothly and linearly put through to the rear wheel. For that to happen there is a lot that goes on. For instance, with the Suzuki Oil Cooling System (SOCS), you get a unique technology that offers a refined acceleration that feels strong and linear. The SEP (Suzuki Eco Performance) engine boasts of superb efficiency without compromised performance. They do this by utilizing 6 sensors (O2 sensor, Intake air pressure sensor, intake air temperature sensor, Throttle position sensor, Engine temperature sensor, Crankshaft sensor) to optimize the ECM that commands the Fuel Injector to inject the precise amount of fuel for optimum combustion efficiency which improves the throttle response and gives you higher fuel efficiency. The slick 6-speed gearbox compliments all the offerings of the new engine.

 

 

Even in terms of handling, the Gixxer 250SF is sublime. In city traffic, it is nimble and adheres to your directions. If you’re out on the highway, the numbers on the speedometer climb up pretty quickly and make light work of most overtaking maneuvers. If you’re ever forced to perform harsh braking, the dual-channel ABS ensures there is very little drama to the entire ordeal. On corners, it is rock steady and inspires the confidence to lean into the bends. The front suspensions are stiff and offer more front end rigidity. Nevertheless, the Gixxer 250SF does a good job of soaking up the tattered city roads of KTM. The ergonomics are sporty, but not to the point of discomfort. The clip-on handlebars are slightly higher set so the rider’s triangle is not too tasking, but it is well disguised to maintain the sporty appeal. We certainly think the Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF is up to the task of touring too.

 

SO DOES IT IMPRESS?

 

Most definitely! The new engine and tech aren’t just gimmicks and you can feel it when you are riding the Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF. Suzuki has got the designing aspects down to a tee and made a very appealing motorcycle. And when you ride it, it gives you what you look for in a 250cc motorcycle. It is a great commuter and get you where you need to go and it does it efficiently. But when you want to have a little fun on it, it’s up to the challenge. But things aren’t too difficult to handle either and it goes easy on new motorcyclists who are developing themselves as improved riders.

 

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The Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF provides a great amalgamation of efficiency and power, which makes for a very fun motorcycle. It stacks up well to its closest rival, the Honda CBR 250R. And it’s priced very decently too, considering the Honda CBR250R will cost you Rs. 6,79,000 while the Suzuki Gixxer 250SF will cost you Rs. 4,96,900 (Rs. 4,99,000 for the Moto Gp Edition here).  Although late to the party, the Suzuki Gixxer 250 SF does make quite an impact on the increasingly popular 250cc segment, and it could be a potential frontrunner in the fight to the quarter-liter segment supremacy.

 

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